Reduce Fat Intake for weight loss

Reduce fat intake for weight loss

Eating a high fat diet may contribute to heart disease. Eating too much fat also contributes to excess body weight, since a gram of fat has about twice as many calories per gram as carbohydrates and proteins. Being overweight may increase your risk of developing high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases (diseases of the heart and blood vessels) and certain forms of cancer.

Whether you are trying to lose weight, lower blood cholesterol levels or simply eat healthier, you’ll want to limit or reduce fat intake.

It’s true that a diet high in fat can lead to weight gain. But it takes more than just eating low-fat foods to lose weight. You must also watch how many calories you eat. Remember, extra calories, even from fat-free and low-fat foods, get stored in the body as fat. Many times, people replace high-fat foods for high-calorie foods, like sweets, and gain weight rather than lose weight.

To lose weight, you need to burn more calories than you eat. You can achieve this goal by exercising and by eating less fat and calories. Exercise burns calories. Consult with your health care provider before starting an exercise or diet program.

A low-fat style of eating is important for maintaining a healthy weight and preventing heart disease.

Learn about the foods you eat. Fat, calorie, and other nutrients in foods can be found listed on the label, in nutrition books at your local library or bookstore, or online at a nutrient analysis website (such as www.mypyramid.gov).

Remember, your body stores extra calories as fat, even if they come from fat-free, trans fat-free, and low-fat foods. If you replace high-fat foods with high-calorie foods, like sweets, you’ll likely gain weight rather than lose weight.

To lose weight, you need to burn more calories than you eat. You can do that by exercising more and by eating less fat and fewer calories.

Eat mostly plant foods (such as vegetables, fruits, and whole grains) and a moderate amount of lean and low-fat, animal-based food (meat and dairy products) to help control your fat, cholesterol, carbs, and calories.

Choose foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids such as salmon, flaxseed, and walnuts for heart health. The American Heart Association recommends eating fatty fish such as salmon twice weekly for the benefits of omega-3 fatty acids.

Choose simply prepared foods such as broiled, roasted, or baked fish or chicken. Avoid fried or sautéed foods, casseroles, and foods with heavy sauces or gravies.

Conclusions There is high quality, consistent evidence that reduction of total fat intake has been achieved in large numbers of both healthy and at risk trial participants over many years. Lower total fat intake leads to small but statistically significant and clinically meaningful, sustained reductions in body weight in adults in studies with baseline fat intakes of 28-43% of energy intake and durations from six months to over eight years. Evidence supports a similar effect in children and young people.

Lowering total fat intake in adults compared with not lowering fat intake was associated with reductions in body weight, body mass index, and waist circumference. These effects were found in studies of more than eight years’ duration,

Although many fad diets and fat-burning supplements promise quick results, modifying your diet, lifestyle, and exercise routine is the most effective way to reach and maintain a healthy weight.